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Author Topic: This has to be new--Metal fatigue  (Read 605 times)

martin goddard

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Re: This has to be new--Metal fatigue
« Reply #15 on: December 15, 2020, 04:58:48 PM »
CM?

martin ???

Colonel Kilgore

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Re: This has to be new--Metal fatigue
« Reply #16 on: December 15, 2020, 05:15:43 PM »
Need-to-know basis, Martin  ;)

Chariot Miniatures, now being sold (seemingly with rather better metal) by Magister Militum.

Simon

martin goddard

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Re: This has to be new--Metal fatigue
« Reply #17 on: December 15, 2020, 05:25:08 PM »
Thanks Simon

The number of letters matched Citadel.

martin :)

Colonel Kilgore

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Re: This has to be new--Metal fatigue
« Reply #18 on: December 15, 2020, 05:34:51 PM »
Well maybe we were all talking about different manufacturers?

At least I know what I was talking about (which was bound to happen one day...  ;D).

Simon

Leslie BT

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Re: This has to be new--Metal fatigue
« Reply #19 on: December 15, 2020, 07:01:25 PM »
Old Citadel and Rafm seemed to be the most prone to problems, by old I mean bought in the 70's. Modern metal standards have reduced the problem.

Brian Cameron

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Re: This has to be new--Metal fatigue
« Reply #20 on: December 16, 2020, 03:33:12 PM »
There is a huge variety of tin alloys available for a range of casting applications (and others with different applications such as bearings).  The alloys vary in properties such as melting point, ability to reproduce fine detail, mallebility, brittleness etc.  Impurities in the metal will affect those properties and much will depend on the quality of the metal used in producing the alloy. 

It's worth bearing in mind that casting figures is commercial business and there's doubtless been producers in the past who have used 'cheap' batches of metal.  Such batches are always available on the market but the drawback is, of course, the doubtful purity.  I was once offered quantities of cadmium for an astonishingly low price.  I asked out of curiosity whether the paperwork would evidence its quality; I was assured that the paperwork could say anything I wanted it to. 

Even if people don't buy 'off the back of the wagon' they may still pick an alloy on the basis of cheapness rather than the suitability for the job.  I'm sure we've all encountered figures with very poor detail - such items are clearly made using a lead-rich alloy which will be cheap but it's the proportion of tin which largely determines the detail obtained.  Some alloys will include a lot of porosity (voids) which weaken the piece.  And some alloys are quite brittle.  I thus suspect that the figures in question were made cast using an unsuitable alloy.  They'll also be susceptible to fatigue at places where the casting changes size or shape - ankles being a good example.

John mentioned 'lead rot'.  Lead actually has good corrosion resistance to acids and seawater.  I use lead sheet for adding weight to my model railway models and I've yet to see any 'rotting'.  Take a look at your lead flashing or balance weights on wheels - they probably won't look like they are falling apart after years of exposure to varying temperature, humidity, pollution, etc.  I'd agreed with John about "a load of rot"; any problems probably result from impurities in the poriginal metal.

Brian

Leman

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Re: This has to be new--Metal fatigue
« Reply #21 on: December 17, 2020, 10:22:29 AM »
Poriginal metal comes mainly from Scotland. Check the legs of any Highlanders in your collection.

Andy