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Author Topic: Currently Reading  (Read 30575 times)

Sean Clark

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Re: Currently Reading
« Reply #30 on: September 28, 2016, 10:30:19 PM »
You mean where the Battle of Bosworth took place in a wood? Yeah, me too.

Leman

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Re: Currently Reading
« Reply #31 on: October 02, 2016, 03:26:43 PM »
Whilst wearing a few sketchy bits of chainmail. It looked totally crap, and, given the current knowledge and number of re-enactors about,  one canopy assume the BBC had a budget of thruppence.

Leman

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Re: Currently Reading
« Reply #32 on: October 14, 2016, 03:32:30 PM »
Why would autocarrot change can only to canopy?  ???

Leman

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Re: Currently Reading
« Reply #33 on: October 14, 2016, 03:38:45 PM »
Well, I wrote a review/summary of the new Rick Priestly/John Lambshead book on writing rules for Tabletop Wargames on the Pendraken site this morning. Perhaps I should say the first 72 pages of said book as it was at that point I hurled it at the wall. I don't recall ever having done that with a book before, but unless you are keen on Warhammer/Black Powder type games, to the exclusion of all else (including, amazingly, historical scenarios of actual battles) then this book is not for you.

Colonel Kilgore

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Re: Currently Reading
« Reply #34 on: October 15, 2016, 10:00:43 PM »
So, I've now finished the Osprey "firebases" book.

I was a little disappointed initially by the apparent lack of detail / precision on bunkers and layouts within the base, but the photos and very good accompanying artwork do convey a lot of information.

Interesting to note the degree of prefabrication of firebase elements, so they could be helicoptered into place. Indeed there is a photo of a batch of watch tower bases, whose structure looks remarkably similar to:



All in all, the books gets a thumbs-up from me.

Sean Clark

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Re: Currently Reading
« Reply #35 on: October 15, 2016, 11:24:22 PM »
Leman,

You raised a smile on my face at the image of you hurling your book at the wall. You've saved me a few quid there  ;D

I had a similar reaction to Neil Thomas' book on ancient wargaming. I just don't get the attraction to it. Many wargamers with more degrees and greater intellect than me really rate the book. It must be way over my head.

Leman

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Re: Currently Reading
« Reply #36 on: October 16, 2016, 09:06:05 AM »
I might well donate it to the city of Bruges as it is full of waffle.  ;)

peterctid

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Re: Currently Reading
« Reply #37 on: October 18, 2016, 11:02:56 AM »
Cromwell's Masterstroke: Dunbar 1650
Peter Reese

This is an excellent account of the battle and campaign-has lots of detail about 17c warfare.

I now want a New Model Veteran(with a Captain Hook style false arm) to be a member of my New Model 2nd Brigade.

Sean Clark

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Re: Currently Reading
« Reply #38 on: November 08, 2016, 08:41:44 PM »


Received this through the door today. It is a gorgeous book with some stunning 'then and now' photographs of key areas of the battle. I'm looking forward to diving in.

Leman

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Re: Currently Reading
« Reply #39 on: November 09, 2016, 12:35:52 PM »
That looks like a very interesting read. I am due to return there next Autumn.

Colonel Kilgore

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Re: Currently Reading
« Reply #40 on: February 12, 2017, 01:07:34 PM »
I have just finished the Osprey Campaign book "Cambrai 1917: The birth of armoured warfare".

I knew very little about the subject before (which is why I bought it!) and found it a very good and informative read from my level of ignorance.

There are notably 5 single-pages of maps / diagrams; 3 double-page spread "Osprey bird's eye view" diagrams; 3 double-page pieces of original artwork [of a combined arms attack on the Siegfried Stellung front line; a Mark IV tank being tackled by German infantry and German Stormtroopers re-taking a section of the Siegfried support trenches].

The artwork is all by Peter Dennis, and contains lots of handy detail for those of us painting troops for the period [including the complete absence of painted camouflage on Stormtroopers' helmets (which I believe came somewhat later) - just applied mud!].

There are also many contemporary photos which, while small, contain a lot of detail.

The author, Alexander Turner, was awarded the DSO as a Major in the Irish Guards in 2011 (some 4 years after the first edition of this book was published) and frequently (but never irritatingly) refers to the events of 2017 through an infantryman's eyes.

The book contains summaries of the opposing commanders and their forces; the plans from both sides; good detail on the battle and short sections on both the aftermath and practical tips for revisiting the battlefield.

I've not read many of these Campaign books, but would thoroughly recommend this one for those interested in the period / Martin's forthcoming Cambrai battle day at Nothe Fort.

Leman

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Re: Currently Reading
« Reply #41 on: February 12, 2017, 04:55:28 PM »
Currentyly working my way through the Conn Iggulden Wars of the Roses series. It's a bit of a a curate's egg to be fair.
1. The pace and plotting is pretty good and you soon start to feel for the various characters. He has a very good way of making you sympathise with characters on both sides, apart from Edward IV, who comes across as a bit of a selfish oik.
2. He does not seem particularly au fait with the art of war in the second half of the C15th, e.g. he still has most troops carrying shields, in the first volume all troops are either armed with axe, pike or bow. As the story continues through volume 2 and 3 he begins to write as if he has thought it might be an idea to look at how warfare was carried out in this period, so, starting with Blore Heath, which is appallingly described, things pick up with 2nd St.Albans with the introduction of handgunners, as well as the defensive paraphernalia used by Warwick. Finally, arriving at Towton, at last billhooks and pollaxes enter the fray (although never described as bills wielded by billmen).
3. Still find his description of Edward IV rather perplexing. Yes, he is 6'4" but black haired and black bearded? I have seen numerous depictions of Edward IV, and he is always shown as clean shaven with blonde or light brown hair. In fact most of the male characters are described as bearded or moustachioed - not a late C15th fashion, in England at any rate.
Despite these quibbles Iggulden does spin a good yarn and it's worth a read if interested in this series of conflicts. He does get one thing absolutely spot-on: these characters really were 'bloody barons.'

mellis1644

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Re: Currently Reading
« Reply #42 on: February 13, 2017, 02:06:31 PM »
For Vietnam the following have their merits, as well as those mentioned:

* The First Battle: Operation Starlite and the Beginning of the Blood Debt in Vietnam by Otto J. Lehrack - a history of the first Marine (and major US ground) battle.

* The novel Matterhorn by Karl Marinates (I'm reading this one at present). It does contain more reality than some may like though and does not hide the nastier side of infantry life - fear, mud, sweat, lack of sleep, uncertainty, pain and stupidity etc..

* With slightly more 'gun ho' attitude but smaller scale stuff which does relate to bigger engagements the 'six silent men' series about the history of 101st LRP's are an interesting read.


Mike Tanner

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Re: Currently Reading
« Reply #43 on: February 13, 2017, 07:10:59 PM »
I am rereading a hardback version of Firepower by Chris Dempster and Dave Tomkins. This book documents the activities of the ill fated British mercenary force under Colonel Callan who fought in Angola bolstering the FNLA against the more powerful communist MPLA back in the 70s.

 

Leslie BT

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Re: Currently Reading
« Reply #44 on: February 23, 2017, 03:57:02 PM »
Reading through the SCW osprey titles and looking at the Canadians on Vimy Ridge in "Victory At Vimy" by Ted Barris that I picked up in Vancouver.