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Author Topic: Mystery of Rome's sunken city  (Read 196 times)

martin goddard

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Mystery of Rome's sunken city
« on: June 06, 2020, 08:31:47 AM »
Watched this documentary on  "5".
A sky channel.
Showed how a port/city was dedicated to fish sauce.
It is in Tunisia on the North African coast.
This fish sauce was very popular throughout the empire.
Potential for a "capture the fish sauce" scenario? "Fish sauce smugglers", "raid on fish sauce factory" etc.(but of latin there! :))
Then it was covered by dredge from a  sunami et al.
Very interesting I think

martin

martin goddard

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Re: Mystery of Rome's sunken city
« Reply #1 on: June 06, 2020, 12:47:16 PM »

Colonel Kilgore

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Re: Mystery of Rome's sunken city
« Reply #2 on: June 06, 2020, 01:08:07 PM »
Sounds similar in concept to the Vietnamese nuoc cham?

Not my cup of tea, but some folk like this?

Simon

Lluis of Minairons

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Re: Mystery of Rome's sunken city
« Reply #3 on: June 06, 2020, 02:10:10 PM »
Here in Catalonia, some years ago it became trendy a dense sauce (kind of a paté, I mean) they called 'Garum'- although it wasn't proper garum as a Roman would call it. It was sort of a paste made of olives and anchovy, that was used as a spread for toasts. Yummy indeed!

No longer seen it since a couple of decades or so, but now it has gained popularity the paste of olives only - called Tapenada or plainly Paté d'olives here in Catalonia. We at home still consume it regularly, again as a spread for toasts. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tapenade.

A modern derivative of proper Garum in Mediterranean 'high cuisine' is the Colatura - an anchovy sauce, sharing those very same 'umami' features usually attributed to Eastern cuisine's Soy sauce. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colatura_di_alici.

We've used it at home in kitchen from time to time, as a dressing when cooking fish, legumes or rice - it's spectacular!  :P

Lluís