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Author Topic: Wire  (Read 346 times)

martin goddard

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Wire
« on: June 01, 2020, 09:36:26 PM »
I use a lot of wire when making figures and models.
Thought i would see what wire others use and like too.

1. Brass rod from .3 mm u to 2mm. Files nicely. Shiny. Bends well. I use about a foot of .3 mm brass wire per week
2. Florists wire. Very cheap. Horrible to file. Bends too easily. Rusts.
3. Copper wire on a reel. Jolly difficult to get hold of. 15amp. Good for armatures and soldering forms. Never gives a straight.
4. 5 AMP fuse wire. Very thin indeed. Great for binding (looks like rope etc).
5.Brass tube. Expensive and delicate. Great for making "stepped" cylinders as in gun barrels. Breaks a lot of Dremel cutting discs. Transmits heat very well. Gets very hot if you hold it with bare hands. 2mm -14mm.

All of the above can withstand the 150' heat of the vulcanising/ mould press.  Plastic is a no no for me, unless using it for a resin model.

martin :)

Smoking gun

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Re: Wire
« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2020, 02:30:32 PM »
Hello,
I use brass wire and tube (use a triangular file to cut to length), thin copper strands from electrical flex to make string and twisted together rope.

For odd pinning jobs bits of paper clip and for tapered gun barrels in small scales hypodermic needles, they have the added advantage of being hollow.

Best wishes,
Martin


Colonel Kilgore

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Re: Wire
« Reply #2 on: June 02, 2020, 02:33:16 PM »
Hopefully not diverting this thread too far: what wire do folks use to model barbed wire in scenery?

Simon

John Watson

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Re: Wire
« Reply #3 on: June 02, 2020, 04:47:54 PM »
I buy ready coiled and barbed wire. I think a number of scenery companies supply it. I then stick some broken cocktail sticks into a sculpted base, paint it up and then artistically drape the wire round the exposed sticks until I am happy with it. Then I fix it with Gorilla superglue (other brands are available).
John

Si B

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Re: Wire
« Reply #4 on: June 03, 2020, 08:55:08 AM »
Hopefully not diverting this thread too far: what wire do folks use to model barbed wire in scenery?

Simon

I made some triple coil entanglements using car body mesh. I cut the mesh along a strand then coiled it around a pencil. It looks great but was quite a faff. It’s barbs are also very sharp. I made a couple of feet about 20 years ago but have never got around to making more.

Leslie BT

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Re: Wire
« Reply #5 on: June 03, 2020, 06:15:09 PM »
Si, I use the same for my wire, a bit fiddly but looks good.  You do get a lot of strands out of a sheet of the mesh.
It also makes good window foils painted black and stuck to the interior of a church window or the like.  Particularly when you do not want to see through but don't want glass either.

Leslie BT

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Re: Wire
« Reply #6 on: June 03, 2020, 06:28:49 PM »
Slaters do packs of brass wire at good prices.

https://slatersplastikard.com/accessories/brassWire.php

They keep chain and plastic as well.

Colonel Kilgore

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Re: Wire
« Reply #7 on: June 03, 2020, 07:26:57 PM »
Les,

Thanks for posting the Slater's site - I hadn't realised one could buy direct.

Can you provide some guidance (I don't know much about railway "scales") as to which size (2mm / 4mm / 7mm) is best suited to 15mm figures / 1:100, please?

Simon

Smiley Miley 66

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Re: Wire
« Reply #8 on: June 04, 2020, 03:53:05 AM »
TT or TableTop it’s an American scale, some say 107th others nearer 120th.
15mm is 3 mm to a foot. 20mm is 4 mm to a foot.
Miles

Colonel Kilgore

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Re: Wire
« Reply #9 on: June 04, 2020, 07:29:39 AM »
Thanks Miles.

So, on the convoluted topic of "scales", it's a mix of metric and imperial measurements in the world of trains - I'd never have guessed that!

I suppose now the question then is - what typically works best visually with 15mm figures (e.g. when selecting embossed plastic card) - 2mm (presumably sized for the 10mm figure "scale") or 4mm (for 20mm)?!

Simon

Smoking gun

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Re: Wire
« Reply #10 on: June 04, 2020, 04:49:28 PM »
Slmon,
You're probably better off looking at American or European model railway suppliers in HO scale 1/87th 3.5mm to the foot. HO buildings look OK with 15mm figures.





Best wishes,
Martin Buck

Colonel Kilgore

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Re: Wire
« Reply #11 on: June 04, 2020, 05:15:59 PM »
Thanks Martin - that looks quite suitable :)

Simon

martin goddard

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Re: Wire
« Reply #12 on: June 04, 2020, 05:48:56 PM »
Martin, is that tank oppressing the masses?

martin

Leslie BT

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Re: Wire
« Reply #13 on: June 04, 2020, 06:29:45 PM »
Simon here's a brief summary for the scales we would use, TT the stuff is smaller, HO the stuff is a bit larger.

Scale   Ratio           Standard gauge           m           e           i           p           Notes
T          1:480   3 mm (0.118 in)               –          –           –           T gauge; the scale ratio of 1:450 in the UK.
Z          1:220   6.5 mm (0.256 in)   4.5 mm   –           –            –           Based on Mδrklin factory standards.
N          1:160   9 mm (0.354 in)   6.5 mm   4.5 mm   –            –            Based on Arnold factory standards.
TT          1:120   12 mm (0.472 in)   9 mm   6.5 mm   4.5 mm   –            –
H0          1:87           16.5 mm (0.65 in)   12 mm   9 mm   6.5 mm   4.5 mm   "Half O"
S          1:64           22.5 mm (0.886 in)   16.5 mm   12 mm   9 mm   6.5 mm   –
0          1:45           32 mm (1.26 in)   22.5 mm   16.5 mm   12 mm   9 mm   

m = metre gauge (prototype: 850–1,250 mm or 33.5–49.2 in)
e = narrow gauge (prototype: 650–850 mm or 25.6–33.5 in)
i = industrial (prototype: 400–650 mm or 15.7–25.6 in)
p = park railway (prototype: 300–400 mm or 11.8–15.7 in)
For instance, a metre gauge model railway in H0-scale would be designated H0m. In German text letter 'f' (stands for Feldbahn) is sometimes used instead of 'i'. Letter 'e' is derived from the French word 'ιtroit' which translates to 'narrow'. NEM gauges are arranged conveniently to use normal gauge of smaller scales as narrow gauges for a certain scale. For instance, H0m gauge is the same as the TT scale normal gauge, H0e same as the N scale normal gauge and H0i same as the Z scale normal gauge

Colonel Kilgore

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Re: Wire
« Reply #14 on: June 04, 2020, 06:40:21 PM »
Many thanks Les - that looks very comprehensive!

I never got the HO/OO thing (Airfix?) can you shed any light on that, please?

Simon