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Author Topic: Rolling scenery  (Read 141 times)

martin goddard

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Rolling scenery
« on: May 07, 2020, 04:55:50 PM »
Now and then I see or hear of a game wherein the scenery moves but the vehicle, ship of men do not.

I tried this once with a 25mm train raid set in the ACW.
5 feet of train track.
Train and coaches with open sides.


What are your thoughts and experiences with such games?



martin

Colonel Kilgore

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Re: Rolling scenery
« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2020, 05:24:16 PM »
I have no experience with this format, but it's a clever idea (similar to racing car video games, when the road rushes past you).

It sounds a little complicated, and doesn't immediately appeal for a "main" game. Perhaps a bit of fun in a gamette (but also lots of scenery might be required...)?

Simon

Nick

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Re: Rolling scenery
« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2020, 06:53:07 PM »
Not for me. Sounds clever but not very practical. For a special one off game maybe but thats all.

Nick

Big Mike

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Re: Rolling scenery
« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2020, 07:03:11 PM »
PITS uses a variation on this idea, with scenery popping up as the game progresses.
Paul and I used a rolling scenery set-up for our WW2 Tunisia campaign which used the PBI gridded system. After very game the last 2 rows of scenery of either table were the basis for the next games  set-up. This depended who won the last game as the losers had to re-form in their last 2 rows.
Mike.

Matías

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Re: Rolling scenery
« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2020, 10:31:37 PM »
We used something similar for a naval game, when we run out of table we would simply move the cloth and that would reposition the ships closer to the center. But Maybe that doesn't count because we where moving the ships.

Brian Cameron

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Re: Rolling scenery
« Reply #5 on: May 08, 2020, 11:24:14 PM »
I recall doing a train-based western scenario where the scenery moved past the train and provided different obstacles and opportunities as the mounted pursuers rode along beside the train.

The only other instance I can think of was a Sudan game using Howard Whitehouse's Science v Pluck rules.  I moved the scenery as the column 'advanced'.  I certainly did for the 'let's stand on the edge of the table' tactic. 

Perhaps it's time to think about using it again for a scenario though a setting doesn't immediately come to mind.

Brian

Smiley Miley 66

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Re: Rolling scenery
« Reply #6 on: May 09, 2020, 08:11:47 AM »
Me and Paul done this with a ship game at Bovington 15 years ago ? Pirates attacking a Container ship.
It took me a bit of time to get around the concept, but it did work well.
Miles

Leslie BT

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Re: Rolling scenery
« Reply #7 on: May 10, 2020, 01:56:42 PM »
One of the very best games using this technique was at Salute in the Kensington Town Hall. It was an old west 28mm Indians chasing a stage coach.

It was all done in black and white as well. The stage coach was set centrally in the table, it was done as galloping flat out. This did not move just all the table around it.

Every thing moved the scenery, and all the Indian troops. Most impressive game.