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Author Topic: Leman partial withdrawal  (Read 598 times)

Leman

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Leman partial withdrawal
« on: October 07, 2018, 01:17:34 PM »
Nothing to worry about folks, but owing to a slight change in circumstances I am going to be spending most of the next 3 months reorganising and decorating my house, which will certainly slow down the painting and limit the number of games I can be involved in, so I probably won’t be posting many photos on the PP site before the religious festival where the majority focus on the material (I’m sure even the pagans saw it as a time for reflection). I intend to come back with a first look at my new wargaming home set-up, which should give me more elbow room than before. Meanwhile I’ll keep posting re. my activities with the Dayshift crew of the LWA.

Colonel Kilgore

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Re: Leman partial withdrawal
« Reply #1 on: October 07, 2018, 01:44:48 PM »
Best of luck, and I for one look forward to seeing your new home set-up in due course!

Mike Tanner

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Re: Leman partial withdrawal
« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2018, 03:45:35 PM »
Good luck with your project. I'd rather have all my teeth pulled out with pliers by Mossad agents than decorate a whole house.


...I probably won’t be posting many photos on the PP site before the religious festival where the majority focus on the material (I’m sure even the pagans saw it as a time for reflection).

I am shocked by your cynicism regarding the majority.  ;)

Leman

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Re: Leman partial withdrawal
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2018, 07:01:38 AM »
Have you ever been in Britain for the Christmas period? September to December 27th, when the super markets strip out the Christmas decorations and the first Easter eggs appear.  >:(

Radar

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Re: Leman partial withdrawal
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2018, 09:21:29 AM »
Love Christmas, hate the Christmas build up. Overhyped consumerist festival.
In my day job I'm an SEN teacher. Many moons ago I taught a young lady who had autism; her mum told me that she always stopped talking about lunchtime on Christmas Day until about Easter. Happened every year. My second Christmas of teaching her, I worked her out. Christmas was so hyped up that Christmas Day was a massive anticlimax. Suggested to her mum that they played it down, really low key, decoration up a week before. Bingo! She started talking all year round.

Ok, very extreme situation, but I really think that it encapsulates the engorgement of the festival.

Have fun doing not-gaming™ Leman!

Leman

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Re: Leman partial withdrawal
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2018, 04:10:27 PM »
Thanks - still getting a weekly game in with the day shift lads down the club. We usually play from about 10:15 until about 1:00, then off to the pub for a wind down, a pint and possibly lunch. However, what is on hold for the moment are my home games and figure painting. I’ve also had to cancel my trip to Warfare as it is too close to Colours for my finances to recover.

Mike Tanner

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Re: Leman partial withdrawal
« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2018, 05:55:45 PM »
Have you ever been in Britain for the Christmas period? September to December 27th, when the super markets strip out the Christmas decorations and the first Easter eggs appear.  >:(

I always loved Christmas as a child because everything shut down for three days and there was peace and quite, and time for family and a ghost story for Christmas (not forgetting the presents eagerly awaited by us children).

Germany was great when I first got here but it is now slowly but surely following the UK along the path to hell. I fully support the old Ladenschlussgesetz laws and would reimpose them tomorrow if I could.


Quote

Unhappy consumers
The road that Germany took to reach its more consumer-friendly store hours was long and bumpy. For 40 years German consumers suffered under a law passed in 1956. With only minor revisions, German shopping hours — and German shoppers — were stuck in the 1950s — until 1996. During those four decades, stores could only remain open from 7:00 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. on weekdays and only until 2:00 p.m. on Saturday. Only once a month (and during the Christmas season) were stores allowed to stay open two hours later on “long Saturdays.”

Never on Sunday
But one thing has yet to change. Shopping on Sunday is still verboten! Although there are some exceptions, Sunday is still a day of rest for shoppers in Germany. If you want to buy anything on Sonntag, you’ll have to go to a train station, an airport, or a gas station mini-mart. (See the few exceptions in some states below.)

Germany’s draconian Ladenschlussgesetz (store-closing law) had no major revisions until October 1989 with the introduction of the “long Thursday,” der lange Donnerstag. On that one day of the week stores were allowed to remain open until 8:30 p.m.

Finally, in 1996, the German parliament (Bundestag) granted German shoppers a long-awaited wish. In the month before Christmas, starting November 1, stores were allowed to remain open between the hours of 6:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. on weekdays and until 4:00 p.m. on Saturday. The long Thursday fell by the wayside. (There have always been exceptions for restaurants and tourism, as well as for bakeries and florists.) But German consumers were still waiting impatiently for more shopping freedom. They were countered by a combination of interests that included German employee unions and the German Catholic and Protestant churches.

Another seven years went by before the Bundestag passed a new law in 2003 that extended opening hours on Saturday until 8:00 p.m. But the really big change came in 2006. In what was called Föderalismusreform, German lawmakers (in the Bundestag and Bundesrat) made the matter of shopping hours a state concern rather than a federal responsibility. Under the law passed in July 2006, each of Germany’s 16 Bundesländer (states) can now regulate its own shopping hours. If a state does not pass its own store-closing law, the federal law remains in effect. To date, only two Länder have failed to do so: Bavaria and Saarland.
https://www.german-way.com/travel-and-tourism/germany-for-tourists/shopping-in-germany/shopping-hours-in-germany/





 

Leman

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Re: Leman partial withdrawal
« Reply #7 on: October 13, 2018, 08:59:33 AM »
I havde to admit that I think longer week evening opening hours and Sunday closing is a good idea. I would much rather go to a cafe in the evening than a pub, but where I live thy all close at about 5:30, just as people are getting out of work, but are open at 7:00 on a Sunday morning!  ???