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Author Topic: 1914 BEF  (Read 1251 times)

Leman

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1914 BEF
« on: May 16, 2018, 10:58:24 AM »
After languishing  in the lead mountain for several years I at last got around to painting up the BEF. There were several reasons for this, not least that I have been reading some pretty good books on the opening months of WWI, with plenty of scope for relatively small scale scenarios (e.g I am currently reading up on Nery, 01/09/14 or 09/01 for those across the pond). I was also struggling for a colour scheme. As far as I am aware no acrylic paint company produces a colour specifically for 1914 Tommies. However, I have recently come across Vallejo green brown and also green ochre. The green brown on its own is ideal for officersí uniforms, and a little (approx. 3:1) of the green ochre makes a great colour for other ranks. I used Vallejo buff for the webbing and Vallejo German camo black brown for the shoes, having read that the men were issued with brown shoes which they then blacked. I finished the figures with Vallejo satin varnish mixed with a few drops of Army Painter soft tone ink wash, and when that was dry I applied a coat of sepia magic wash so the figures ended up protected and shaded.




martin goddard

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Re: 1914 BEF
« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2018, 04:21:27 PM »
Hope they stop the German horde.

Leman

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Re: 1914 BEF
« Reply #2 on: May 16, 2018, 04:43:18 PM »
Well now that I have some extra uhlans and dragoons, plus another howitzer to add to my previously purchased cavalry, it should prove interesting - four large German cavalry regiments with artillery and machine gun support, up against three smaller British cavalry regiments, with reinforcements arriving in the form of two infantry battalions.

Colonel Kilgore

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Re: 1914 BEF
« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2018, 09:03:51 PM »
They're looking very nice, Leman.

What do you use for your base texturing?

Leman

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Re: 1914 BEF
« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2018, 12:49:29 PM »
Hi Colonel, the texture I am using is a change from my usual. Mostly I use Vallejo pumice, but for these bases I decided to use the smooth Winsor and Newton Galleria modelling paste (the same as I use on my ACW 3mm figure bases) applied with the plastic spatula in the GW sculpting pack.

The colours I intend to use when completed are:
Yellow ochre
then a wash of chocolate brown
then a dry brush of 50:50 mix of yellow ochre and buff

After that it will be flock, tufts, the occasional rock, bushes, tree trunks etc.

Colonel Kilgore

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Re: 1914 BEF
« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2018, 10:15:42 PM »
Thanks, Leman - I'd not heard of that modelling paste before but it looks very interesting. What was your reason for changing in this instance from your normal pumice?

Please post some photos of the finished articles!

Leman

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Re: 1914 BEF
« Reply #6 on: May 18, 2018, 01:46:11 PM »
I first used the modelling paste to texture some MDF timber framed buildings. I then occurred to me that for really small figures, 6mm and below, this would be better than the pumice, as the grit can look too large in those scales. In fact, with the 3mm figures I donít use flock either as it too would swamp the figures. I then thought about the north European terrain, mainly woodland or heavily ploughed agricultural land, therefore it might look better to apply grit in small patches rather than have the whole base like that, The 2Ēx1Ē bases should allow for a bit of diorama work. The other factor in my choice is that the modelling paste is slightly easier to apply than the pumice, especially when using a small, old brush to get into tight areas.

I will continue to post pictures as this project develops, especially as the majority of figures used are PP. The Khaki has already gone on the second battalion, as well as two casualty figures (one for each battalion - I thought putting the morale marker next to a casualty would look good) and a cavalry packed machine gun from TSS. The rules assume machine guns are being carried by the cavalry, but I thought it would be appropriate to have a couple of bases for mounted troops as they were available. Iím also planning on some naval and marine activity around Antwerp, which Iím looking forward to, although I will have to make up some house rules for the Minervas and RNAS armed lorries.

Colonel Kilgore

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Re: 1914 BEF
« Reply #7 on: May 18, 2018, 02:49:51 PM »
Thanks, Leman: that's really helpful insight.

So, maybe I need to get myself both pumice and paste...

Mike Tanner

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Re: 1914 BEF
« Reply #8 on: May 18, 2018, 11:43:23 PM »
Excellent paint jobs. I hope one day my painting I can reach that standard.

Leman

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Re: 1914 BEF
« Reply #9 on: May 19, 2018, 09:13:03 AM »
Thanks Mike. I find after decades in this hobby that I am still developing my painting skills and finding new techniques to improve. Adding the Army Painter ink to an acrylic varnish is something I have only recently thought of, but it does seem to kill two birds with one stone and speed things up a little. Similarly the British khaki for the BEF took me a good half dozen attempts at different paint mixes before I hit on the green brown, green ochre mix.

Leslie BT

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Re: 1914 BEF
« Reply #10 on: May 19, 2018, 10:47:14 AM »
The other difficulty for trying to match colours to materials so old unless you have access to the patterns for the material you do not actually know what the colour should be, most of the old fabrics were dyed with liquids that are not light fast and did not stand up to the sun and rain as do modern fabrics.
Also when painting scale models often the smaller the figure the more you have to make a cartoon effect to emphasize the figure.

I painted some WW1 aircraft and if you used the factory colour specification the colours changed within days of leaving the factory. And also different manufacturers of the paints and dopes produced different colours of the same colour as they used different ingredients.

So the colours become very subjective.


Colonel Kilgore

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Re: 1914 BEF
« Reply #11 on: May 19, 2018, 12:11:08 PM »
So the colours become very subjective.

Which is my excuse for going with what I feel looks right, rather than necessarily the received wisdom on the "correct" colours :)

Leman

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Re: 1914 BEF
« Reply #12 on: May 20, 2018, 09:21:46 AM »
I suppose the other thing we tend to do is get an approximation that looks acceptable to us and also differentiates the two opposing armies. It would be a different proposition if painting a diorama for public exhibition.

Leman

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Re: 1914 BEF
« Reply #13 on: May 20, 2018, 04:07:16 PM »
Ok folks, the German tunics look good, but the trousers not so good - more blue than grey. Having looked at the photo of the actual German uniform on Lurkioís painting guide the trousers are definitely darker, but more towards grey green than grey blue. I will try the grey green straight from the pot on one of them to see how that looks. MUST REMEMBER TO KEEP PAINTING NOTES.

martin goddard

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Re: 1914 BEF
« Reply #14 on: May 20, 2018, 04:48:04 PM »
I tend to like my colours lighter than real because I use my figures indoors, which is lower light than outside. Also my eyesight is very poor indeed!